Procrastination (or the post that took 7 months to write)

Yes, you’re not reading it wrong. It took me seven months to write this f****ng post.

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As much as I’d like to blame my lack of posting to my new job, my trips to renew/get a new work visa, the holidays, a nighttime shift, charitable charity, a sports league I joined but never went to a game, an Instagram-worthy social life, failed business ventures, food comas, global warming, modeling gigs, stunt double duties, being mistaken for a famous person, exploding phones, Exploding Kittens or even trying to win the Lotto jackpot—the truth is I didn’t write a post because I was procrastinating the shit out of it.

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I swear I even had at least ten good topics I could write about (and by ten I mean I had between 0 and 2).

So, when I saw a fellow writer documenting her trip to the other side of the world, her 30-day journey to learn how to draw, and a few other posts she wrote after that, I forced myself to write this.

So let’s talk a little about PROCRASTINATION

Look, I was gonna do some deep research about its origins, causes, if there’s an actual medical condition associated with it, but honestly, I would end up procrastinating that too. So, ya’ll end up with the next best thing: a Wikipedia article! (come on, click it, you know you want to).

So much winning!

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Next, I spent a couple more days procrastinating.

And then, as the truly great creative I am, I went to Giphy.com to find the GIFs I needed and finish this post 10 minutes before my next meeting.

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I even got a guest writer to help me, but she procrastinated too and this is the only thing she could come up with:

Sopenis by Alice X.

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The dilemma of presenting live vs. presenting digitally

Ok, I have to come clean. I love Mad Men as much as anyone else who works in the ad industry does. But this post is not about how much we love this show. It is about what this show can teach us (aside from drinking and sleeping on the couch during office hours).

Like presenting an idea live.

Remember this scene from Mad Men?

Yes, I know. This is one of the most famous scenes in the whole show and everybody has talked about it before on countless blogs (some of which I have read). A former teacher from ad school even used to say that this is the pinnacle of how a client presentation should be set.

But today I’m not digging into the mechanics of how to build a deck (that might be a topic for another post). Today, I’m going to talk about the dilemma of presenting your creative live vs. the comfort of presenting it digitally.

 

While sending a deck to the client over email and waiting for their comments might sound like the comfiest thing to do (especially if booking a meeting is near to impossible). Sometimes you need that extra “oomph” (this is not a word, obviously). What I mean is that sometimes you need to paint a more comprehensive picture to your client other than just words and images over a PDF.

For example, a few months ago, we presented a couple of ridiculous radio spots to a client. For the first one, I had to act the voice over and the SFX so the client could imagine how the final product would sound. The second one was presented with a spec spot that we badly recorded on our computers.

Both were sold and produced.

Why?

Because the client didn’t have to imagine them.

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I know that this might be harder to do with TV spots or more innovative ideas. But that’s why I started this post with that Mad Men scene. Because if Don Draper had put that speech on a deck and emailed it to the client, he might not have sold the idea.

When we present live, we can act, we can paint, we can play with our client’s imaginations. Guide them to see and think the way we did when we created the idea.

When we send it digitally, we can only hope they see it the same way as we imagined it.

And let me ask you a question. How many of you have sent or received an ambiguous text message that could be interpreted in so many ways?

Exactly.

So if you really want to sell an idea, book that meeting. Don’t leave it to chance.